Articles by Karl Rove

When Politicians Loathe The Press

Wall Street Journal | May 21, 2015

Most politicians occasionally get upset at the media. But few demonstrate as much contempt for journalists as do Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Sometimes it appears they’d prefer a state-run media rather than a free press.

For example, last week at a Georgetown University conference on poverty, President Obama indulged in a favorite pastime: attacking Fox News (for which I am a political contributor). 

The Democrats’ Baffling Behavior

Wall Street Journal | May 14, 2015

The year isn’t half over, and already more than a few things in the Democratic political world have left me puzzled—and in some cases downright mystified. 

My perplexity starts with former President Bill Clinton. How has such a talented man become so tone-deaf? When NBC’s Cynthia McFadden asked him about potential conflicts of interest raised by large contributions from foreign governments and companies to the Clinton Foundation, the former president answered, “All I’m saying is that the idea that there’s one set of rules for us and another set for everybody else is true.” 

The GOP’s Health-Care Reckoning

Wall Street Journal | May 7, 2015

If the Supreme Court holds in King v. Burwell that the Affordable Care Act—also known as ObamaCare—does not allow subsidies for health coverage to flow through federal insurance exchanges, Republicans better be ready to say what to do next. Under such a decision, roughly eight million Americans in three dozen states would lose subsidies worth thousands of dollars. Many would suddenly find it impossible to pay for the insurance plan they’re on now.

President Barack Obama will then accuse conservative justices of overreaching and demand that the GOP Congress immediately extend subsidies to every state. His message will be politically potent.

The Messes Obama Will Leave Behind

Wall Street Journal | April 30, 2015

At last Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, President Obama declared he was determined to “make the most of every moment” left in office, saying he had been working on a “bucket list” that included executive action on immigration and climate regulation. Aware that his critics believe he’s often acted lawlessly, Mr. Obama joked that the title for his list rhymes with “bucket.” 

Regardless of what items Mr. Obama checks off, he will leave to his successor a staggering array of domestic problems, some he ignored and many he made worse. 

Congress Is Finally Back On Track

Wall Street Journal | April 23, 2015

The dysfunctional Congress finally appears to be working again as the Founders intended. Lawmakers are negotiating, voting on bills and actually passing legislation. As proof of this, National Journal’s Charlie Cook points to three things: congressional approval of a permanent “doc fix” to prevent cuts to physician reimbursements under Medicare; extension of the Children’s Health Insurance Program; and passage of budget resolutions by the House and Senate.

There’s even more evidence. This week Senate Democrats agreed to move forward on a human-trafficking bill without undoing a 39-year-old ban on federal funding of abortion.

Attacking Hillary Won’t Be Enough For The GOP

Wall Street Journal | April 16, 2015

To bond with “everyday” Americans, Hillary Clinton left her million-dollar Chappaqua, N.Y., mansion Sunday in the “Scooby-Do Mystery Machine” van, bound for Iowa. It was déjà vu all over again: In 1999 she started her U.S. Senate campaign by driving around upstate New York in a van also called “Scooby.”

The new van’s leather interior, 29-inch flat-screen TV with Blu-ray, and a power sofa that converts into a bed won’t turn Mrs. Clinton into America’s middle-class granny, especially after the salesman who helped deliver it explained, “It’s very luxurious.” There’s a weirdness to this trip, a lack of excitement and purpose that seems a metaphor for Mrs. Clinton’s campaign. 

Hillary Needs More Than An Image Makeover

Wall Street Journal | April 9, 2015

After Hillary Clinton left the State Department in early 2013, her favorable rating was 64% and her unfavorable rating 31% in an April 14 Gallup poll. In a March 4, 2015, Gallup poll, respondents were 50% favorable, 39% unfavorable. That’s not a good trend.

Nevertheless, the Hillary Juggernaut rolls on. She has no significant challenger for the 2016 presidential nomination—though 66% of Democrats in a March 24 CBS poll wanted Mrs. Clinton to face one. 

The Myth Of The Stay-At-Home Republicans

Wall Street Journal | April 2, 2015

There’s a hypothesis circulating among Republicans that Mitt Romney lost in 2012 because a large number of previously reliable conservatives who turned out in past elections stayed home. Here’s the problem: It’s not accurate. 

First, let’s look at voter turnout. It dropped to 129.2 million in 2012 from 131.5 million in 2008, according to David Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Elections. But the drop-off was not among conservatives. According to exit polls, self-identified conservatives made up 35% of the 2012 turnout, and 82% of them voted for Mr. Romney. This translates into about 45.2 million conservatives who turned out—roughly 531,000 more than in 2008.

Super-PAC Strategies For 2016 Success

Wall Street Journal | March 26, 2015

By using Twitter to announce his entry into the 2016 Republican presidential race, Sen. Ted Cruz signaled just how pervasive social media will be this election. Two other trends are worth watching. There will be a greater reliance on data and technology in organizing, communicating and measuring the effectiveness of campaign activity—and every presidential candidate will have a Super PAC.

The $2,700 a person contribution limit to a candidate’s campaign for the primary season means donors who are able will donate larger amounts to the Super PAC supporting their favorite candidate.

The New Price Of Running For President

Wall Street Journal | March 19, 2015

While juggling questions of a candidate’s performance, message and organization, every Republican presidential strategist also spends lots of time thinking about money. First comes this question: How many dollars must a candidate have to be competitive in the opening round of 2016 contests? 

It’s tough to settle on a number for the buy-in now. Few states have passed laws setting their primary or caucus date, so it may be months until the calendar is locked in. It’s also difficult to decide how much of each kind of activity is necessary.